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Pacific call for China to look beyond politics

Micronesia climate change
Secretary Elieisar reiterates President Panuelo’s call for China and the United States of America to make climate change a distinct and non-political matter for discussion and cooperation. Source: FSM government.

One of the most affected island countries to be impacted by global warming has pleaded with one of the world’s superpowers to refrain its debate on climate change away from political ideology.

The Federated States of Micronesia made its presence felt at the inaugural China-Pacific Island Countries meeting via video link days ago involving 12 nation states.

Federated States of Micronesia president David Panuelo, speaking on behalf of a disperse group of Micronesian islands that stretches nearly 3000 kilometres, asked China to “work together with the United States of America in making climate change a distinct and non-political matter”.

Political tensions with the US have been ramped up in recent weeks, escalating from the Americans’ defence of Taiwan should China follow through on threats to attack its much-debatable sovereignty.

The Micronesians have strong diplomatic relations with both of the rival nations and aired their concerns to the Chinese after Panuelo took the reins from his foreign affairs secretary Kandhi Elieisar.

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“As climate change is an existential threat to humanity, with the threat projection being total civilizational collapse within our children’s lifetimes, Micronesia urges China to work together with the United States of America in making climate change a distinct and non-political matter for discussion and cooperation with all countries in the world,” Panuelo said.

“Neither China nor the United States can fix climate change alone, but if our two allies work together, convincing other allies like Australia to come on board, and friends like Brazil to do more, we can still save humanity.”

The developing nation is one of the most directly threatened by long-term global warming, resulting from an increased level of greenhouse gases accumulating in the earth’s atmosphere.

Accelerated sea-level rise and its geographical location only increases its vulnerability while future global warming holds the possibility of creating more frequent, intense or longer-lasting El Nino droughts.

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